Launch of new Audiology Clinic at Arthur Davison Children’s Hospital

Launch of new Audiology Clinic at Arthur Davison Children’s Hospital

We are happy to announce the launch of our new Audiology Clinic at Arthur Davison Children’s Hospital (ADH) in Ndola, Zambia, which was officially opened on 20th June 2019. This is an incredible achievement as we celebrate the opening of a second audiology clinic in a government hospital in Zambia.

The new audiology service is fully equipped to complete hearing assessments for adults and children and includes an ear mould lab to fit hearing aids for those identified with hearing loss, which is currently being led by our volunteer Audiologist, Matt Clarkson, who has been in Ndola since February overseeing the setup of the new audiology clinic (you can read Matt’s blog on his experience volunteering here).

As part of the project, we have sponsored one of the nurses from ADH to study for a year at the University of Nairobi for a Diploma in Clinical Audiology and Public Health Otology, who will return to ADH later this year to lead the audiology services going forward.

 

We would like to say a special thank you to Jersey Overseas Aid for their generously funding this project as without their support, none of this work would be possible.

Additionally, we would like to say a massive thank you to all the team at ADH and our volunteer Audiologist Matt, for all their hard work in the set-up of the clinic.

Since the clinic opened in June, over 50 patients have already been seen and those identified with hearing loss have received the appropriate management.

Special Needs Teachers Training & After School Clubs in Ndola

Special Needs Teachers Training & After School Clubs in Ndola

In March 2019, thanks to the generous support of the British and Foreign School Society, we started a new project in the only 3 deaf units in mainstream primary schools in Ndola, Zambia. We trained 30 special needs teachers that work within these units  at Kanshenshi, Kamba and Chilengwa Primary schools to advance their Zambian Sign Language skills to improve the quality of education delivered to their deaf students.

 

As part of our new project in Ndola, Zambia, we also set up weekly after school clubs within the 3 deaf units in primary schools, led by the trained teachers and a sign language interpreter, to help teach basic sign language for mainstream students and help to improve inclusion and interaction between deaf students and mainstream students.

Please click here to read more about the project’s progress so far, celebrated during Deaf Awareness Week 2019. 

Official Launch of Children’s Hearing Clinic in Zambia

Official Launch of Children’s Hearing Clinic in Zambia

    

On the 27th October 2017, thanks to the hard work and dedication of our Volunteer Audiologist, Bhavisha Parmar, the Children’s Hearing Clinic in University Teaching Hospital (UTH) was officially opened by the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Health, Dr Jabbin Mulwanda.

This is the first paediatric clinic of its kind in Zambia, which is fully equipped to assess the hearing of children at risk of hearing loss and provide the necessary hearing aid fittings, follow up and rehabilitation.

It was a day to remember for our Volunteer Audiologist Bhavisha as all her hard work and preparation over the past few months paid off, at the successful official launch:

“I didn’t quite realise what I was getting myself into when I proposed the idea of having a big opening ceremony of the Children’s Hearing Clinic and it took on a whole different life when the Ministry of Health suggested I link it with the launch of the first ever Ear, Nose and Throat Strategic Health Plan.” 

The launch was well attended with over 120 people including: was officially opened by the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Health, Dr Jabbin Muluwanda.

The launch was a huge success, with 120 people attending including Sound Seekers CEO Emma Judge, the British High Commissioner to Zambia, CEO of Beit Cure Hospital, CBM Country Director, Senior Medical Superintendent of UTH, President of Zambia National Association of the Deaf, and representatives from the Ministry of Education.

During the launch, Bhavisha took to the podium and spoke of ‘The Need, The Now and Next for Audiology services in Zambia.  You can watch Bhavisha’s Speech here:

She was followed by Sound Seekers CEO, Emma Judge, who spoke about this great achievement

A speech was also conducted by the Permanent Secretary of Health services on how the Ministry of Health were committed to supporting the growth of audiology services in Zambia and the importance of the ENT strategic plan.  He spoke on behalf of the Minister of Health, whose speech included this paragraph which was followed by great applause:

“It has come at a great time when we are restructuring the health sector, and I am glad to inform this meeting…that positions for ENT have been established in all our provisional centres. But most importantly, for this gathering, is that audiology positions have also been included in the current structure” 

After the speeches, Bhavisha along with others in attendance were then led to the new Children’s Hearing clinic after Dr Muluwanda cut the ribbon that was placed around a bound copy of the ENT plan to officially mark its launch.

 You can watch the cutting of the ribbon of the Children’s Hearing Clinic here:

Bhavisha described this memorable moment and her excitement for the future of Zambian audiology and ENT services.

“I was relieved and excited for the future of Zambian audiology and ENT services. The opening ceremony of a clinic is very much just the beginning and commitment is needed at a government level to ensure the continual growth of services with adequate follow up and support for children with hearing loss as well as their families.”

We would like to thank everyone who supported and attended the launch, making it possible for children with hearing loss in Lusaka to gain access to much needed audiology services. Thank you.

You can read Bhavisha’s full blog post of the lead up to the Launch on her fantastic journey of her year in Zambia here.

Volunteering in Ndola

Volunteering in Ndola

Earlier this year, Adonye Banigo volunteered for Sound Seekers in Ndola, Zambia. We asked him about his experience and what advice he would give to anyone planning to volunteer with Sound Seekers.

Q Why did you agree to volunteer for Sound Seekers in Zambia?
A Well, volunteering for Sound Seekers was sort of my idea. Sound Seekers provides a perfect combination of my chosen specialty as a doctor (Ear, Nose and Throat surgery) and my passion for improving the lives of children and adults in the developing world. I approached Sound Seekers in August 2011 and expressed my desire to volunteer, I also attended the AGM in December 2011 and saw some of the work being done. At the time there didn’t really seem to be any projects I could get involved in, until Emily Bell came along. And anyone who knows Emily knows how passionate she is about projects in the developing world. It was an interesting turn of events because I had got used to pestering Sound Seekers about getting onto a volunteer project; now I was having to explain to Emily that a year of volunteering was probably a bit too long for me! Next thing I knew I was jetting off to Lusaka. I was willing to go to any African country, really and Zambia just happened by chance, but I cannot emphasise how blessed and lucky I am to have visited such a beautiful country with amazing people.

Q How did it feel volunteering in an African country having lived in the U.K. for so long?
A It felt wonderful volunteering in an African country, it was easy to settle in and mix with the locals. I did voluntary work in Gambia and Senegal during medical school so I have had some experience of volunteering in Africa. I remember back then it struck me how different other West African countries were from my home country, Nigeria. Zambia was even more different, from the weather which distinctly lacked humidity to the tolerant calm people that always seemed willing to help. African countries are very unique with different healthcare needs, so I learnt the importance of targeting my volunteering experience to areas of most need.

Q What was the high point for you?
A The HARK! out-reach in Kanseshi Basic School for the deaf was an amazing experience. It was a busy two days where we saw many students and tested their hearing. What made it special was seeing how the students did not let their hearing and speech impairment affect their ability to interact. They were outgoing, confident and entertaining.
In a brief interlude during the day, we had a deaf musician perform and he got everyone on their feet showing off their dance moves. Emma Case photographed many of these fantastic moments.

Q What do you feel you gained from the experience?
A I learnt that even though I am still in training to become a qualified ENT surgeon, I have acquired knowledge and skills I can use to improve the lives of deaf people in the developing world. I gained more confidence and a feeling of self-worth, a contrast to life working in the NHS where one can feel insignificant and not appreciated at times. From all the staff I met in the different hospitals I visited in Zambia, I have gained a lot of friends who are like my family now and I know we will continue to keep in touch for many years to come.

Q How do you feel the work Sound Seekers does makes a difference in developing countries?
A Sound Seekers is doing significant work in developing countries and making a huge impact on many lives. The HARK! outreach service provides primary ear care to individuals in remote areas. The training courses funded by Sound Seekers are building local knowledge and expertise. The equipment we supply is aiding diagnosis and treatment of ear, nose and throat disorders. Now we are looking to set up local training courses in Zambia for ENT clinical officers, which will help boost the numbers of clinicians with ENT expertise in the country. I feel privileged to be a part of Sound Seekers and I hope more funding becomes available to help support our work.

Q What three pieces of advice do you have for other potential volunteers?
A Do it, do it, do it! Volunteering for Sound Seekers is an experience that will stay with you for life for all the right reasons. And because Sound Seekers is a relatively small organisation, it is personable and has a close-knit group of staff that will make sure you are looked after when you volunteer. If you don’t quite feel up to jetting off to an African country you know little about, there are lots of other ways you can volunteer by raising money locally through charity events, etc. Get in touch with the very nice Sound Seekers team for more info.

Q If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be and why?
A I would eradicate poverty and the disparity between the rich and the poor because poverty is a common denominator in individuals in developing countries with poor health.

Q What are your future plans? Are there any more missions on the horizon?
A I have lots of plans for the future, but in relation to volunteering I have no further missions planned as yet but watch this space…