Back in East Africa – land of the mouse kebab

Back in East Africa – land of the mouse kebab

Lucy (Sound Seekers CEO) tells us about her first trip to Malawi

My first time in Malawi. A huge welcome from the Bartletts at the ABC Hearing Clinic, who welcomed me into their family for the whole weekend, providing piles of pancakes and showing me round Lilongwe. The first time for seeing a roast mouse kebab (five little blackened corpses on a stick, which would make my cats feel like there was some justice in the world after all) and the second coldest I’ve been in Africa.  The first coldest was in the volcanoes in Rwanda, when I was woefully underpacked.  The same woeful underpacking had occurred this time, reducing me to wearing socks with sandals in a non-ironic way. And heating up a brick in the oven where I was staying, and taking it to bed with me.  Although I had a fairly comprehensive moan about it, it was a good reminder about how tough life can be for the people Sound Seekers are trying to help. I was only there for a week, freezing but healthy and full of beans – and then heading home to a bizarrely warm England. Going on outreach with ABC Hearing Clinic and Project Compassion was the fresh shock all over again of how poor people really are, and how early treatment could make people happy and pain-free so much sooner than the reality. I saw Peter Bartlett and his team carefully and delicately dig out huge plugs of rock-solid, dark brown earwax that had been keeping people in silence for years. It took an hour to pull out a red bead from deep inside an old woman’s ear, with so much wax grown round it that she’d been unnecessarily deaf for far too long.     I saw people queuing patiently for hours for ear infection treatment that would be sorted out in minutes back in prosperous England. And children so serious and hard-working that there was no chance of play audiometry, because they didn’t have any idea of an adult focusing on them and just having fun.

Clinic QueueI hope we can do a lot more in Malawi, and we have the exciting prospect of extending our work there. I would love to deepen the audiology service in Blantyre, building with Dr Wakisa Mulwafu, the only ENT doctor in the country. We want to be greater than the sum of our parts, collaborating with other NGOs. We’re gratefully accepting help from the ABC Hearing Clinic with supporting our sponsored audiological associate in Blantyre for a week a month (thanks, Rosanna!) and hope that we’re helping them by sending a HARK mobile hearing clinic to make more outreach possible.  The cold and the six hour wait in Addis Ababa airport are almost forgotten and forgiven when I remember the sun in Lilongwe, the poppadums bigger than my head in an Indian restaurant in Blantyre, and most of all seeing people hearing again after treatment. The brand-new Cadbury’s Dairy Milk flavour and the costumed dancers at the airport welcoming the inaugural direct flight from Kenya were pretty good too.