Launch of new Audiology Clinic at Arthur Davison Children’s Hospital

Launch of new Audiology Clinic at Arthur Davison Children’s Hospital

We are happy to announce the launch of our new Audiology Clinic at Arthur Davison Children’s Hospital (ADH) in Ndola, Zambia, which was officially opened on 20th June 2019. This is an incredible achievement as we celebrate the opening of a second audiology clinic in a government hospital in Zambia.

The new audiology service is fully equipped to complete hearing assessments for adults and children and includes an ear mould lab to fit hearing aids for those identified with hearing loss, which is currently being led by our volunteer Audiologist, Matt Clarkson, who has been in Ndola since February overseeing the setup of the new audiology clinic (you can read Matt’s blog on his experience volunteering here).

As part of the project, we have sponsored one of the nurses from ADH to study for a year at the University of Nairobi for a Diploma in Clinical Audiology and Public Health Otology, who will return to ADH later this year to lead the audiology services going forward.

 

We would like to say a special thank you to Jersey Overseas Aid for their generously funding this project as without their support, none of this work would be possible.

Additionally, we would like to say a massive thank you to all the team at ADH and our volunteer Audiologist Matt, for all their hard work in the set-up of the clinic.

Since the clinic opened in June, over 50 patients have already been seen and those identified with hearing loss have received the appropriate management.

Thuvaraka’s two weeks in Cameroon

Thuvaraka’s two weeks in Cameroon

I recently spent 2 weeks volunteering in Cameroon Mbingo Baptist Hospital with my colleague & friend. I spent these 2 weeks working in the ENT department supporting the audiology technicians and also providing a training workshop in line with the WHO guidelines. Soundseekers were amazing in supporting me through this experience. Mbingo hospital is beautiful and all the people there are extraordinary. I enjoyed my whole time there, especially interacting with the children from the deaf school.

Volunteer in Cameroon, Africa in audiology hospitalDuring my week Amina and I were helping the ENT Audiological technicians with the testing and providing amplification  to adults and children. It was wonderful to see how hearing aids were helping them. The smiles and words after they started hearing with hearing aids was reassuring. We also spent time looking through inventory and making sure that this clinic had the correct material  and equipment to keep running well.

During my second week I was part of a team facilitating a training workshop on primary ear and hearing care produced by the World Health Organisation to nurses and teachers of surrounding health centres and schools . This was an amazing week of training and one I would facilitate again. Not only were we able to share knowledge and practices about ear care, we were also able to make sessions very interactive and innovative . We got a clear idea about participants thoughts and about how change can be implemented and/or evoked in their communities.

Volunteer in Cameroon audiology hospitalOverall these 2 weeks were amazing and I would definitely go back. Soundseekers are an incredible organisation who are dedicated in helping and supporting people in Cameroon. I am so grateful that they sent me here and I would definitely recommend any health care professionals to go and to be a part of this wonderful charity.

Thuvaraka Chandrapavan, Cameroon 2016

A day in the life of an international audiologist volunteering in Malawi

A day in the life of an international audiologist volunteering in Malawi

Dr Courtney Caron, an Audiologist from the United States takes us through a day in her life as a Sound Seekers volunteer in Malawi.

There is no such thing as a typical day.  Every day is different.  The needs are different.  The patients are different.  What is needed from me is different.  I have to prioritise what is needed most on any particular day.  One thing is for sure though, a day in the life of an audiologist in Malawi is never boring.

Having dodged the chaos of Blantyre’s streets where carts loaded with the fruit of the season, bicycles loaded with charcoal or goats and ladies carrying 20 litres of water on their heads, weave in and out of the traffic.  I spend the first half an hour answering emails from Sound Seekers, audiology equipment manufacturers, potential volunteers, other NGOs and the Ministry of Health.

Patients start arriving around 8am for various appointments: hearing tests, vestibular/balance assessments, ear mould impressions, hearing aid fittings, etc.  There are usually one or two audiology officers taking patient histories and doing various tests but as the only audiologist in Blantyre, I try and review all patients’ tests and recommendations or assist with complex cases.  Patients vary as much as my daily activities.  I may see a 90 year old man with hearing loss due to old age, a three year child who has suffered from cerebral malaria, a 25 year old man with Down’s syndrome or a 40 year old woman who has received an antibiotic that is known to cause hearing loss.  Each patient is different and requires a different way to diagnosis and treat them.  It takes experience and knowledge as well as a little creativity to ensure all patients receive appropriate care.

There is one audiology officer in training and he requires some additional time from me to help with reviewing assignments, understanding intricate ideas or having additional hands-on training in order to help him succeed in his course.  I also have management activities to do in order to keep the Sound Seekers’ project and the audiology department running smoothly.  We are in the process of building a comprehensive audiology clinic so I have to do tasks such as identifying where the electrical outlets should be and sort through quotations to furnish the building.  My day ends around 5pm and I return home through the chaotic streets of Blantyre.

Kerry’s marathon

Kerry’s marathon

Kerry Downes, an audiologist at St. George’s Hospital NHS Trust in London, ran the London marathon for Sound Seekers and raised over £2,000 in the process. We asked Kerry about all the training, fundraising, and of course the big day itself.

13902925013_d4b8922bf9_bHaving done a half marathon and a few 10 km runs over the years, I’d always wanted to do a full marathon – so when the opportunity came to run the London Marathon for Sound Seekers, I jumped at the chance. My trip to Sierra Leone in November was still fresh in my mind, so I knew just how important every penny raised would be. However the task of raising £2000 in 10 weeks was initially as daunting as the run itself. Working as an audiologist definitely helped as patients and colleagues were particularly interested in the work that Sound Seekers do. While most money came from donations, a cake stall at work and a raffle with prizes donated from local businesses together raised nearly £500. I also emailed the local papers around the area I’d grown up, and they kindly printed articles about my trip to Sierra Leone and fundraising efforts. I was overwhelmed by people’s generosity. Huge donations came in – from colleagues and patients to my tennis coach 20 years ago and even strangers!

Training had its ups and downs. Running after work in January in the cold and rain wasn’t ever going to be fun, and I suffered from the common runner’s injury ITBS syndrome fairly early on – meaning a few weeks off in my already tight 11 week training window. But my distances slowly increased and my knee eventually healed. I’d only managed 17 miles before the big day, I quite simply ran(!) out of time, so was quite nervous about not finishing.

The sun shone beautifully on the day and the supporters were even more amazing than I’d anticipated. My family came down from Yorkshire and many friends in London came along to support me along the route, I even spotted Emily from Sound Seekers at mile 15 thanks to her good set of lungs screaming my name! Miles 20-25 were seriously hard, but the miles crawled by and at last I was turning that corner by Big Ben and heading down the Mall to get my medal.

Whilst fundraising can be daunting, I’m so glad I did it for a cause close to my heart as it made the run all the more meaningful (and something to concentrate on in those moments of pain!). I reached and even exceeded my £2k goal, and will remember the day forever.